Soldiers Send Greetings to Their Mothers

Today, on May 12th, Ukraine is celebrating Mother's Day, which is a good occasion to once again thank every mom for her care. UA|TV gave this opportunity to Ukrainian soldiers. Right on the front line, our journalists recorded their video greetings and then - brought them to their mothers

uatv
12.05.2019

On school teacher Viktoria Karikova’s desk there’s a photo of her son’s military unit.

You can also find a flag signed by the soldiers.

“We bring this flag to all of our events. I say to my son, ‘Even the dust from your trenches has been preserved on this flag,'” Karikova said.

When the war began, Yarikova’s son enlisted in the Ukrainian army.

“He came and said, ‘Mom, I’m going to the front line.’ I tried to change his mind, but it didn’t work out. Then I understood that it’s his job to defend his homeland. This matter was no longer discussed in our family. I’ve been waiting for him to return home for four years now,” Karikova said.

Karikova’s son, Rostyslav, is a commander of a unit with dozens of troops. Rostyslav says that since entering the military he began to truly understand the value of parental love and care.

“You can clearly understand here how much your mom loves you. She calls you every day, she is worried about you. You realize that your mother’s warmth and love is the best defense here,” Rostyslav said.

Rostyslav asked that a video greeting be sent to his mother for Mother’s Day. In it, he said:

“Any bulletproof vest can’t protect me as much as my mother’s prayer. My mom is the best, she loves me. She’s waiting for me, I know about that. I want to wish her many years of health. She’s the best. Mom, I love you!”

In the Rivne Region, which is halfway across the country, Nadia Handziuk also watched a video greeting from her son, Ivan.

“My mom is the best and she’s the nicest. I miss my mom. I’ll come back home soon. In a little while. You’ve been waiting for so much! Wait a little more,” Ivan said.

Ivan joined the military but kept his decision a secret. He told Handziuk he had a work trip, but only later revealed the truth. Handziuk said that her son was always a good boy growing up. In her home, she keeps a collection of his paintings and a military award, which her son insisted she have.

The best reward for Handziuk, Karikova, and thousands of other Ukrainian mothers is undoubtedly when their sons and daughters return home from war.

“Most of all I care about her feelings, I don’t want her to worry about me a lot. Because all those frayed nerves aren’t good. Most of all I want to make everything good,” Ivan said. “I’ll be back soon, I will be able to see you soon, you will have me near you. Wait for me, I’ll be home soon.”

Source UATV
date 12.05.2019
categories News releases, Society
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